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living with mesothelioma

Emotional Health

After many of the more pressing issues have been resolved, some patients still deal with serious emotional issues during the various treatment phases. Depression, anger, anxiety and frustration often occur with patients as they carry out the long and arduous process. For those patients with a previous history of substance abuse, the impact of the diagnosis may lead to a relapse into addiction as a means of escape. With the frequent need for pain medication that most treatment regimens prescribe, such patients could do more damage to themselves by abusing the drugs that they need to manage their condition.

The emotional aspect of the treatment schedule is almost as important as treating the disease itself. Oncologists, nurses, mental health workers and family members can all participate in this portion of the process. Family members and friends can be observant of the patient’s behavior and watch for any signs of mood changes or alterations in attitude. The patient may be depressed about a lack of progress or frustrated about attending treatment sessions, so the family should do what they can to encourage a positive outlook during this trying time. Health care professionals involved in the treatment routine should also keep an eye on the patient’s emotional barometer. Mental health care specialists can help the patient work through their tumultuous emotional issues and give them the best opportunity to complete their treatment successfully.

Another source of anxiety that patients encounter is the changes in their appearance that often arise from their treatment. Weight loss, hair loss and skin conditions often appear as side effects of radiation treatments and chemotherapy. In the case of breast cancer, patients may require a mastectomy (removal of the breast tissue). These alterations can significantly affect the patient’s self-esteem and self-image; the patient may not feel as attractive, young or vital as they did pre-diagnosis.

Many hospitals and specialty stores carry wigs, makeup and prosthetics to help patients deal with the changes in their appearance. Some cancer patients use these changes as an opportunity to experiment with their self-image. A patient that started treatment with long, blond hair, for example, may want to try a brunette bob wig. Another may use different shades of foundation and lipstick for a new look. Such activities can serve as a distraction from the more painful effects of treatment and allow the patient to forget about their condition for a brief moment.